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Timeframe Of Resolution For A Sex Crime Case

Interviewer: How long do you think that a typical case could potentially last?

Eric Sachs: In general, a normal case for prostitution shouldn’t last more than a couple of months. It’s when they get a little bit tricky, like the sting cases, or if there’s publicity, that they can go longer. Your run-of-the-mill prostitution case should be able to be resolved within just a few months. If you’re showing the person’s innocence or they’re a prostitute and they need to get into a program, being able to work out all the programs that are available and get them treatment, get them the help – all these things happen pretty quickly and then the court system will oversee them to make sure that they’re staying with the program and they’re getting better.

A John who gets arrested should be able to be resolved relatively quickly, without dragging these things out. It’s only when it’s the special cases that become more of an issue for publicity reasons or political reasons or the sex trafficking cases – the more serious cases – that will take a longer time.

Aggressive Prosecuting Varies by Community

Interviewer: Why do you think there are harsher crimes in some states than others? Do you ever work with clients from other states where the crime is prosecuted less harshly?

Eric Sachs: On the prostitution side? Not really. We know that in Nevada, for instance, prostitution is not legal, but there are various locations that we hear of where it takes place. Do they turn a blind eye to it? I don’t know, I guess it goes back to the old Wild West where we all have our visions of the horses and the old sheriff and the jails, which was out back in those days. In big cities like New York, do they turn a blind eye on it or handle it a certain way? My instinct tells me that it depends on where it takes place and what the community is like as to how much or how little it will be tolerated and what the community’s feeling is at the time and if they’re cleaning up the community, so to speak.

We want to get drugs out of here. Drugs breed prostitution and prostitution breeds drugs, so we’re going to get all of these people out of here, and they do that clean up. I think although it’s the same law throughout the state, it depends on where it takes place as to how it needs to be punished and dealt with to discourage other people from engaging in that activity in that location.

By Eric Sachs